Section Name Description
File Civic Education for Sustainability: Course Syllabus
File Hebrew Syllabus - Civic Education for Sustainability
File KIT with Annotated Syllabus for Civic Education for Sustainability
File KIT and READER in GEORGIAN: Civic Education for Sustainability
File List of topics in Course
Folder Logos
Teaching methods of course File Vake Scenerio for Civic Education for Sustainability
UNIT 2: POLLUTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION-- Topic: Air Pollution Folder Bibliography

 

Compulsory Literature:

International Energy Agency (2016). Energy and Air Pollution-World Energy Outlook Special Report, European Commission 

http://www.iea.org/publications/freepublications/publication/WorldEnergyOutlookSpecialReport2016EnergyandAirPollution.pdf


 

איכות האוויר, מזהמים, מקורות זיהום:

קלצ'קו ש' ושות', (2003). עוברים לירוק ב', משרד החינוך האגף לתכנון ולפיתוח תכניות לימודיות, 27-40, 52-73.

תופעות מקומיות, בזיהום אוויר והשלכותיהן:

קלצ'קו ש' ושות', (2003). עוברים לירוק ב', משרד החינוך האגף לתכנון ולפיתוח תכניות לימודיות, 95-97, , 117,46-51.

תופעות גלובליות  של זיהום אוויר והשלכותיהן:

קלצ'קו ש' ושות', (2003). עוברים לירוק ב', משרד החינוך האגף לתכנון ולפיתוח תכניות לימודיות, 97-117.

קלצ'קו שרה  ושות', (2014). יש לנו רק כדור אחד  אוויר, רעש וקרינה. אוניברסיטת בר אילן, מטה מל"מ ואגף מדעים, המזכירות הפדגוגית, משרד החינוך המרכז להוראת המדעים.

שטסל ז' ושות', (2004). משאבים וסביבה, משרד החינוך, הוראת המדעים, אוניברסיטת ירושלים, 135-222.

 

 

 

 

Supporting Literature:

 

Schnelle, K. B., & Brown, C. A. (2002). Air pollution control technology handbook (Vol. 244). Boca Raton, FL: CRC press.

 


 

 

 

 

Supporting Literature:

 

Schnelle, K. B., & Brown, C. A. (2002). Air pollution control technology handbook (Vol. 244). Boca Raton, FL: CRC press.

 


UNIT 2: POLLUTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION-- Topic: Soil Pollution and Degradation Folder Bibliography
UNIT 4: ECONOMY-- Topic: Energy Sources Folder Rationale and Objectives

Energy is a critical source that enables human lifestyle. For many years, fossil fuels (coal, oil and gas) were used for transportation, industry, electricity production, heating etc'. Using these sources; causes air pollution and emissions of greenhouse gases that are triggering the changes in the global climate. The awareness in the world of the need and the importance to replace the fossil sources with renewal, such as wind, solar, geothermal and hydroelectric, is increasing. Investing in renewable energy sources is not onlly from envirinmental consideration, but also from political and economical.The rise in the prices of fossil fuels, the depletion of the world reservoirs and the dependence on countries that supply the fuels empowers the need to seek for alternativ energy resources

Folder Learning Outcomes

Students will internalise the environmental, health, economical and political implications of using fossil fuels vs. renewable one.

Students will be aware of the need to use renewable energy resources instead of fossil sources.

Students will reduce unnecessary energy consumption. Will use energy saving bulbs and electrical appliances with environmental certification

Students will consider using renewable energy sources in their daily life.

Students will recognise the optional energy sources: fossil and renewal, their advantages and disadvantages.

Students will understand that:

The use of fusil energy sources increases the emission of the greenhouse gas – CO2 that contributes to global warming and climate changes. Increasing the use of renewable energy sources will enable replacement of fusil sources, reducing CO2emission and global warming.

Using fusil sources contributes to air, water and soil pollution that is linked to breathing problems, neurological damage, heart attacks, and cancer. Replacing fossil fuels with renewable energy sources has an economic impact because it has been found to reduce premature mortality, healthcare costs and lost workdays.

Using renewable energies may increase countries independence of energy suppliers.



Folder Activities

Activity 1: Divide the class into groups. Each group will concentrate on a specific source of energy. Each group will list the advantages and disadvantages of this energy source and will prepare a power point presentation to the class. 

Activity 2: Students will collect their family's electrical consumption for the last year. They will then present a graph of energy consumption per person (family consumption/number of persons in their family) per month. They will

  • Describe the graph
  • Explain  what causes the monthly variations in the graph 
  • Suggest how to reduce energy consumption in the family 
  • Suggest how to reduce energy consumption in the community

Activity 3: To show excerpts of the film about the car which is powered by solar energy and discuss the pros and cons of using solar powered cars and analyze the reasons why the idea was not a success. 

Folder Bibliography

:קריאת חובה
 קלציקב ש' ושות'. ( 2003).עוברים לירוק ב'.משרד החינוךהאגף לתיכנון ופיתוח תוכניות לימודיות, 206-152


Supporting Literature:


רב שיח בנושא שטחים פתוחים ואנרגיות חלופיות

 

יעל כהן פארן, ניר פפאי, הלל זוסמן וניר אנגרט, איתן פרנס, נעם אילן, דן אלון, אפרים שלאין

ינואר 2010, גליון 1, עמ' 75-66



UNIT 4: ECONOMY-- Topic: Food Security and Sustainable Development of Agriculture Folder Topic of Lesson

*Give students information about what global
challenges agricultural sector is facing (poverty, hunger, agricultural land
decreasing trends, threats ... genetically modified products); Food security
and sustainable agricultural development 
and  its universal significance.

* Become familiar with the principles of food safety and environmentally sound
production

*Exploring the development of a modern agricultural complex situation and food security, and providing access to the current level

* Get acquainted with the Food Safety and the poverty reduction strategy and the
tactics of the basic principles, the basic attitudes of the agricultural policy
and sustainable agricultural development of a safe assessment principles of
food safety issues and alternative farming. (FAO; UN)

Folder Topic Rationale and Objective

Agricultural sustainable development in three main aspects (economic, social, environmental) awareness of the importance and the new global agenda to learn the principles of food security and sustainable for the future.


Folder Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and understanding:

- Aware of , food security, global economic and environmental challenges: food security-access-sufficiency;

Aware of , Food security problems and economic and environmental sustainability of agriculture;

_Aware of international  and national documents in the field of  food security;

-Aware of the rights,obligations and responsibilities of food security and poverty reduction.

Applying knowledge
and skills:

- using  of food security and sustainable rural development in the program development process;

Statistical materials, situational analysis and problem solving and develop new ways;

·        
Conclusions:

 to search news in the agricultural field , analysis and generalization of the rate;

Values;

_Aware about  rights, obligations and responsibilities of food safety issues.

- knows own importance of sustainable agricultural development and food security in the area

-solidarity and tolerance ability about developing countries.


Folder Teaching Methods

Lecture and seminar working hours will be built according to the interactive teaching principles.  

 


Folder Activities


During the seminar working hours theoretical materials will be strengthened with group and pair works, discussions, debates, role-plays and case studies, discussing the video-materials, topics will be taken  from agricultural sector. 

Activity 1: The activity begins with a short frontal lecture about poverty and its reasons . One of the reasons deals with food availability and production. Each group will choose a certain food product (bread, meat products, vegetables, oil,fish etc) They will describe what they know about this specific product. How it is produced? How is the production of this product affecting the environment? What challenges are involved in the production of this product? How many kilo calories are there in a daily portion of this product? How important is this product for a person's nutritional daily needs? How available is this product for a family under poverty level? How can we suggest ideas for improving the production of this product in a more sustainable manner? 

Activity 2: Each group will pick a more developed country and developing country.They will access information concerning food production in those  specific countries  and  actual nutritional consumption of a household in that country(basic family basket), They will compare the data between the two countries and describe the implications of the inequality in worldwide food production and distribution, and will suggest possible solutions in lessening the gap between the countries.



Folder Bibliography

1.     New Sustainable Development Agenda, Leaving No One Behind; 2015

2.     Sustainable

agricultural development for food security. FAO REPORT) 2016;  http://www.fao.org/3/a-i5795e.pdf

3.     Food and Agriculture
Organization, The State of Food Insecurity in the World, 2014. http://www.fao.org/3/ai4030e.pdf

4.      International Food Policy Research Institute,
Global Hunger Index, 2014. http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ghi14.pdf

5.     World Food Program,
Hunger Statistics. http://www.wfp.org/hunger/stats

6.     The World Bank: Poverty
Overview 2014. http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/poverty/overview

7.     United Nations, World
Urbanization Prospects: The 2014 Revision. http://esa.un.org/unpd/wup/Highlights/WUP2014-Highlights.pdf

8.     Food and Agriculture
Organization, The State of the World’s Land & Water Resources for Food
& Agriculture, 2011. http://www.fao.org/nr/water/docs/SOLAW_EX_SUMM_WEB_EN.pdf

9.      European Commission, Science for Environment
Policy: Climate Change to Shift Global Spread & Quality of Agriculture
Land, 2015. http://ec.europa.eu/environment/integration/research/newsalert/pdf/climate_change_to_shift_global_spread_q uality_agricultural_land_403na1_en.pdf

10.  The Woodrow Wilson
Center for International Scholars, Food Security & Sociopolitical
Stability, 2013. http://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/food-security-and-sociopolitical-stability

11.   Emmy Simmons, Harvesting Peace: Food Security,
Conflict & Cooperation, 2013. http://wilsoncenter.org/sites/default/files/HarvestingPeace.pdf

12.   The World Bank, World Development Report 2008,
Agriculture for Development Policy Brief: Agriculture & Poverty Reduction. http://siteresources.worldbank.org/SOUTHASIAEXT/Resources/223546- 1171488994713/3455847-1192738003272/Brief_AgPovRedctn_web.pdf

13.  USAID Frontlines,
March/April 2015.


/>


Literature:

1.P. Koghuashvili, Food security: Reality
and Prognoses,
Tbilisi, 2004;

2.  www.statistics.ge

3.
www.fao.org.ge

4.
www.informaworld.com 

5.
www.worldscinet.com

6.
www.oecd-ilibrary.org


UNIT 4: ECONOMY--Topic: Trading Folder Topic of Lesson

What do we eat, where does it come from and how much does it cost

Managing food waste in relation to local and global food sources

Fair trading: how the transportation of commodities can be sustainable.



Folder Rationale and Objectives

The aim of this unit is to provide an opportunity to think about the interaction between local and global trading and the impact that this might have on communities that are near-by and far away. Central to this module is the opportunity to critique the central tenants of global capitalism and the influence of ‘big business’ alongside the call for more sustainable ‘local’ economies. This module does not promote any particular economic model but rather it seeks to engage students with the complexity of providing products for willing consumers.

 

2. Understanding global and local challenges of the environment and their inter-relationship

4. Enhancing the awareness and the implications of human activity on the environment

5. To instill knowledge in which students develop civic values concerning environmental involvement and activity

6. To identify and develop critical thinking regarding future sustainability issues from different perspectives (political, social, ecological, cultural, economic, legal, etc.).


Folder Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to appreciate the need for successful small scale and global businesses to support human activities and flourishing and to be able to critique their impact on the planet and others. Students should be aware of the potential positive role that cooperatives can play in wealth distribution. Students should understand the wide-ranging impacts of their consumer habits on local and global people, places and resources. It is also expect that students will begin to consider the role of money and wealth creation on what it means to be human and happy.

 

1.       To acquire and  apply knowledge relating to sustainability in the community

2.       To analyze and suggest solutions to problems regarding sustainability

3.       To enable students to integrate traditional and innovative knowledge in developing attitudes towards sustainability from different perspectives (political, social, ecological, cultural, economic, legal, etc.).

4.       To develop a sense of responsibility towards sustainability on a global level

7.    Applying the interactivactive relationships between local and global sustainability issues.


Folder Teaching Methods

Guided group work

Research/survey

Frontal teaching and discussion

Folder Activities

Activity 1: Guided group work - What do we eat, where does it come from and how much does it cost?

Interrogate pictures from Time Magazine To consider food origin, transportation and economic implications.

Porritt, J. (2013). The World We Made: Alex McKay’s story from 2050. London: Phaidon Press. (Travel and Transport sections)

Scoffham, S. Making Connections.

 

Activity 2: Research/survey - Managing food waste in relation to local and global food sources.

  Researching how and where your family, friends, local shops and restaurants buy their food.Provide advice in a booklet for your local community about how to reduce food waste (think about how  local and global implications).

National Geographic article  Food waste quiz

 

Activity 3:Frontal teaching and discussion - Fair trading: how the transportation of commodities can be sustainable. Compare the advantages and disadvantages cheap of short lived commodities with expensive longer lasting ones.

Paradox of choice video

 

 


Folder Bibliography

Compulsory Literature:

 English:

Food waste quiz

National Geographic article

Paradox of choice video

Porritt, J. (2013). The World We Made: Alex McKay’s story from 2050. London: Phaidon Press. (Economics and Finance sections)

Kemp, S. Fashion for the Planet HEA

https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/fashion-planet-sustainability-consequences-clothing-material-and-supply-chain-decisions#sthash.ACkopils.dpuf

Stiglitz, J.E. and Charlton A. (2007). Fair Trade for All: How Trade can Promote Development. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

(Travel and Transport sections)  Scoffham, S. Making Connections.

Yunus, M. (2003). Banker to the Poor: Micro-lending and the Battle Against World Poverty. Philadelphia, PA: Perseus Book Group.

 


Hebrew:

  Arabic:

  Georgian:

  German:

 

Supporting Literature:

Mohin, T. (2012). Changing Business from Inside Out. Sheffield: Greenleaf Publishing.

 

World Commission on Environment and Development (1991). Our Common Future. Oxford: Oxford University Press


UNIT 4: ECONOMY--Topic: Transportation and Communication Folder Rationale and Objectives

The aim of this unit is to focus on the human desire to travel both short and long distances and to set up means of communication that connect people and products nationally and globally.

Central to this module is the need to explore the technologies that are used for movement of people or products such as cars, trains, planes, boats and the role played by mobile and internet technology.

The ‘wicked questions’ asked in this module include: how mobile and internet technologies seduce individuals into wanting things (or places) previously unimagined, how mobile and internet technologies facilitate travel and communication, are biofuels/electric vehicles environmentally beneficial and would it be possible to be happy without holidays and cheap products from abroad and storing vast amounts of data in ‘clouds’.

 

2. Understanding global and local challenges of the environment and their inter-relationship

4. Enhancing the awareness and the implications of human activity on the environment

5. To instill knowledge in which students develop civic values concerning environmental involvement and activity

6. To identify and develop critical thinking regarding future sustainability issues from different perspectives (political, social, ecological, cultural, economic, legal, etc.).


Folder Learning Outcomes

It is expected that students will be able to think critically about the comparatively recent impact of the global movement of people and products: this would include being able to identify what the personal, social and economic strengths and weaknesses might be. Students shall also be able to discuss the advantages and disadvantages surrounding the tensions of living locally in a global world. It is also expected that students can consider the paradox that sustainable thinking requires complex connections to be made and yet the maintenance of these connections often require non-sustainable behaviours.

 

1.       To enable students to integrate traditional and innovative knowledge in developing attitudes towards sustainability from different perspectives (political, social, ecological, cultural, economic, legal, etc.).

2.       To develop a sense of responsibility towards sustainability on a global level

3.       Enabling students for shaping a policy regarding the future enforcement of a sustainable society

6.    To acquire a sensitivity towards different opinions regarding sustainability issues.

7.    Applying the interactivactive relationships between local and global sustainability issues.


Folder Activities

Activities

Activity 1.Critical: reading of articles in the  newspaper, and watching  TV news,  regard to issues of environmental regulation

 Critical discussion

Activity 2,  Find out more about the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals from this website. Divide the students into pairs and ask them to investigate one goal each and report to the rest of the class about what that goal is all about.

United Nations Global Goals


Activity 3.  As an research activity, ask students to investigate one international agreement of their choice from 1962 onwards.

 


Folder Bibliography

Khorheh, M.A., Moisiadis,F., and Davarzani, H. (2015). Socio-environmental performance of transportation systems. Management of Environmental Quality;Bradford 26 (6): 825-851

Veronique Van Acker, Phil Goodwin & Frank Witlox (2016) Key research themes on travel behavior, lifestyle, and sustainable urban mobility, International Journal of Sustainable Transportation, 10:1, 25-32, DOI: 10.1080/15568318.2013.821003

 

Porritt, J. (2013). The World We Made: Alex McKay’s story from 2050. London: Phaidon Press. (Travel and Transport sections)

Scoffham, S. Making Connections.

 http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/education/our-work/exploring-sustainability/making-connections.aspx

 

English:

 

Hebrew:

  Arabic:

  Georgian:

  German:

 

Supporting Literature:

Susanne Becken (2007) Tourists' Perception of International Air Travel's Impact on the Global Climate and Potential Climate Change Policies, Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 15:4, 351-368, DOI: 10.2167/jost710.0


Unit 12: Local and Global Community Folder Rationale and Objectives

Global environmental awareness is a comparatively recent phenomenon that which emerged with the development of mass air travel and the introduction of new technologies after the Second World War. At the same time our ideas about the Earth were radically transformed by the space programme that furnished images of the earth as a blue and white globe floating in the deep darkness of space. Modern electronic communications now link the world as never before and consequently the local and global are becoming increasingly intertwined.

We are also aware to the extent that the modern world is fractured and divided with especially marked disparities between modern industrialised nations and the countries of sub-Saharan Africa. Additionally, there are long-term regional conflicts in some areas which it can be argued are signs of environmental stress and political inequality. People have always moved around the world throughout human history but the current pressure of human numbers and the signs that economic growth means that migration and the movement of refugees is a highly contentious issue for the local and global communities.


Folder Learning Outcomes

Students should understand that although they cannot trace the impact of their actions, what they do and the things that they buy have an impact on other people and the environment around the world. 

 

Folder Activities

Activities

Activity 1:

There are different ways in which people and the environment are connected at a global level.  Students will find issues which link local activities to global outcomes.  Examples might include:

how air pollution created by industry and traffic in developed countries contributes to climate change around the world

hunting endangered animals in one part of the world to use in other places can lead to their extinction disrupting ecological systems

the impact of water pollution, irrigation and hydro-electric dams on the upper regions of a river such as the Nile affects people downstream

how lack of water, food and environmental problems are sometimes the root cause of international migration

the potential for solar energy invented in one part of the world to be adopted globally to reduce fossil fuel consumption

 how international action to ban the use of CFC gasses from factories and home use has succeeded in stopping the growth of the ozone hole which has begun to disappear 

Activity 2: The class will discuss the problem of global migration In terms of local environmental problems and its global impact.


Folder Bibliography

Compulsory Literature:

Koser, K. (2007). International Migration: A very short introduction. Oxford: London.

 

Collins (2012). World Watch. Collins: London

 

Worldwatch Insitute. http://www.worldwatch.org/


The Global Risks Report 2017 12th Edition


Plastic Pollution in seabirds: Midway Island




 

Supporting Literature:

http://www.hardrainproject.com/exhibition/whole-earth


Unit 13: Government: Local and Global Regulation Folder Rationale and Objectives

This unit will enable students in getting to know the regulators of environmental protection in their country. Who are they, what are their responsibilities, what are their roles and how do they act.  They will also find out about how nations around the world are working together to solve environmental problems. The United Nations agreements are one very important way of devising a framework for international action.

Understanding the complexity of the environmental regulator work, that sometimes is affected by special interest groups, which are not the public interest, is very important. This may contribute to shape literate citizens, aware of  the political aspect of environmental issues, that will enable them to make decisions and to be involved in the community.

 

Students will know who are the GR regarding environmental issues in their country:

·         In Israel: The "Ministry of Environmental Protection" and the "Ministry of Health" .

·         In Georgia:....

·          

Students will understand:

·         GR role in policymaking , in promoting laws and regulations aimed to protect the environment and in enforcing them.

·         GR responsibility of providing citizens with good local environmental conditions (e.g., air, water, radiation, food).

·         GR  responsibility in preservation of environmental resources.

·         GR responsibility in reducing CO2 emission and promoting alternative-energy systems to deal with global warming.

·           GR activities under conflict of interests (e.g. industry, agriculture, transportation, urbanization).  

            GR commitment to the OECD policy, and international conventions (in Israel, Georgia ?).

            United Nations and other international agreements (eg Sustainable Development Goals and Paris

             Climate Change agreement

·       Understanding the political complexity of environmental issues (e.g., closure of factories that are polluting the environment / employees will lose their workplace / municipal authority will lose their property tax).

 

 

 

 

 


Folder Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to relate with a critical point of view to environmental issues in the media (daily newspaper articles, news on TV,  documentary films etc.). To analyze the situation and to recognize factors affecting decision-making and enforcement.

Optional: Students will consider in the next government elections a party with green agenda.


Folder Activities

Activity 1.Critical: reading of articles in the  newspaper, and watching  TV news,  regard to issues of environmental regulation

 Critical discussion

Activity 2,  Find out more about the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals from this website. Divide the students into pairs and ask them to investigate one goal each and report to the rest of the class about what that goal is all about.

United Nations Global Goals


Activity 3.  As an research activity, ask students to investigate one international agreement of their choice from 1962 onwards.

 


Folder Bibliography

Compulsory Literature:

1.https://www.mcc.gov/resources/doc/environmental-guidelines August 26, 2010 DCO-2012-1.2 

2. Green Politic- http://greenalt.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/mwvane_politika_da_garemos_dacva.pdf 3.Environmental and Social politic http://www.ebrd.com/downloads/research/policies/esp-georgian.pdf

 

 

Supporting Literature:

 


Unit 14: Safe and Just Environment Folder Rationale and Objectives

A key priority for sustainable living should focus on developing long term political and social policies that will enable the global community (human and non-human) to live within planetary limits. From an ecological perspective the finite nature of the planet we inhabit contains boundaries, that if exceeded will cause systems to collapse with potentially major and unexpected consequences. It is accepted that human cannot flourish with adequate access to clean water, clean air, food shelter and other life support systems. Therefore, the challenge of the twentieth first century is to provide a safe and just place for humans to flourish within these wider and increasingly pressured ecological limits.

At the UN Paris summit in 2015 nations from around the world adopted and agreed to implement a set of goals. These are known as that Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs and apply from this date to 2030. These goals provide a framework for future policy and action which hold out the promise of a safe and just environment in which all people can have their basic needs met. Implementing these goals suggests the need for transformative thinking, leading to economic policies which acknowledge and safeguard natural resources and respect the rights of human beings.


Folder Learning Outcomes

In this unit students will have considered the notion of prosperity and understand that it involves a number of dimensions.  The acquisition of material wealth is one aspect but a broader perspective includes human happiness and well being and a concern for the future generations and the balance of life on Earth. Through their engagement with a specific issue students will have investigated relevant facts and information, reflected critically on what they have learnt and developed their own perspectives and points of view.   One possible outcome is that they will have become more involved with the community in relation to environmental justice. It is recognised that this is a slow process but every student should have acquired the foundations for future action.

Folder Activities

Activity 1: Students should define the concepts of "safety" ,  "justice", and "environment". They will write their ideas on the class board. At the end there will be a collective description of these terms. The students will then try to connect their definitions to the environment and state examples. The teacher will then develop a discussion regarding elements that may be missing from the students presentation.

 

Activity 2: The students will apply what they have learned about environmental safety and justice t based on their observations and experiences. This could be done through taking photographs and sharing them in the class portal and subsequently discussing them in a class forum.   

Activity 3: Case study: The teacher will present an actual situation (i.e. developing beachfront property for commercial use,  building an electrical power station in urban areas, building parking lots, building recreational parks, building and expanding roads, etc. ).  The class will conduct a discussion concerning the situation from the vantage point of environmental justice and safety. They will suggest means of civil action that could be taken in order to improve the situation. This could also be done as a group activity with case studies distributed to various groups within the class. This can also be done as a "role playing" activity(community interest groups, journalists, developers,etc) 

Activity 4:  Students will watch Kate Raworth, who has devised the idea of 'doughnut economics, giving a TED talk:

Doughnut Economics


Figure 1 - Securing prosperity in the years ahead involves building on secure social foundations and respecting ecological limits. (After Raworth 2017

The diagram illustrates how the things which human beings need in order to flourish are linked (a) to ecological limits and (b) based on human needs. If we put too many demands on the environment we risk degrading the planet on which we depend.  If fail to create the conditions where everyone is able to meet their fundamental needs for water, food, housing and social justice we are creating deprivation and misery which is liable to get worse as resources became scarcer. The optimum position - the green area in the diagram - is a just and safe place for everyone and which we need to promote.  Students should discuss what they think prosperity means.  Is it just that some people are very rich while many are very poor?



Folder Bibliography

Compulsory Literature:

Jackson, T. (2017). Prosperity without Growth. London: Routledge

 

Raworth, K. (2017). Doughnut Economics: Seven ways to think like a Twentieth Century economist. London: Penguin.

 

United Nations (2015). Sustainable Development Goals

https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/?menu=1300

 

Supporting Literature:

Porritt, J. (2013). The World we Made. London: Phaidon Press

 

Maxton, G. and Randers, J. (2016). Re-inventing Prosperity: Vancouver: Greystone Books.


Unit 15: Teaching about sustainability Folder Rationale and Objectives

Teaching about Sustainability Rationale and Objectives: Sustainability education is a dimension to learning rather than a traditional subject discipline. It is significantly different to other areas of the curriculum as there is no established body of knowledge to master making the boundaries difficult to define. We would suggest that adequate knowledge and understanding to enable students to make good enough decisions is sufficient to support the sustainably literate student. A distinguishing feature of sustainability education is a commitment to care for the well-being of the human and non-human world. Sustainability education raises questions about the things we value, the way we relate to others and the stories we tell ourselves which help make meaning in our lives. Teachers need to be aware that learning about sustainability problems has the potential to be overwhelming. Approaching environmental problems with a positive but grounded approach offers hope for both learners and educators. Thus, it provides an opportunity to develop interactive and participatory learning communities promoting the humanitarian values which underpin a sustainability mindset.

 

Folder Learning Outcomes

Students will know that sustainability is a complex global issue with many dimensions, all of which are inter-related and influence the ecosystems on which we depend. 

They will understand why pupils need to learn about some key issues and the action that can be taken to minimise their harmful impact on the environment.

Students will have reflected on how to teach pupils about sustainability issues through interactive, participatory activities which make learning more meaningful and encourage their involvement in the community.


Folder Activities

Activity 1.  Ask each student to write down what they think sustainability means in a sentence or short paragraph. Get them to compare their ideas in small groups to work out a group definition.  Share these around the class.  Now introduce the students to two key diagrams (figure 1 below).  Both these diagrams emphasise that sustainability has several dimensions - environment, social and economic.  

Definitions Figure 1


Activity 2.  Watch these videos to find out more about what sustainability might mean.

 

Activity 3.  Students should discuss the importance of teaching about sustainability. Do they think it is important in all subject areas?  Why should children - future citizens of the world - know about global and local environmental issues?  

Activity 4: Students will be divided into 17 groups. Each group will discuss one of the goals of sustainable development according to the United Nations – 2015, will give examples and will explain its relevance to everyday's life. Then each group will share their work in front of the classroom.

Activity 5: Students will suggest experiential and meaningful teaching methods for teaching about sustainability, and will plan activity for school's students.






Folder Bibliography

Compulsory Literature: 

Hicks, D (2014) Educating for Hope in Troubled Times. Trentham Books: Stoke-on-Trent 

Sterling, S. (2001) Sustainable Education: Re-visioning learning and change. Green Books: Totnes 

Stibbe, A. (ed) (2009). The Handbook of Sustainability Literacy: Skills for a change world Green Books: Totnes. 

Supporting Literature: 

Scoffham, S.(2013). Do We Really Need to Know This? The challenge of developing a global learning module for trainee teachers, International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning 5(3): 28-45

Scoffham, S. (2014) Exploring Sustainability Website. URL: http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/education/our-work/exploring-sustainability/exploring-sustainability.aspx

 Scoffham, S. (2016) Grass Roots and Green Shoots: Building ESD capacity at a UK University, in Challenges in Higher Education for Sustainability. Springer: Switzerland.

 Jones, P., Selby, D. and Sterling, S. (eds) (2010). Sustainability Education: Perspectives and practice across higher education. Earthscan: London.